Everdell board game
Everdell board game

Everdell

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Overall Rank: #27 | Trending Rank: #10
Within the charming valley of Everdell, beneath the boughs of towering trees, among meandering streams and mossy hollows, a civilization of forest critters is thriving and expanding. From Everfrost to Bellsong, many a year have come and gone, but the time has come for new territories to be settled and new cities established. You will be the leader of a group of critters intent on just such a task. There are buildings to construct, lively characters to meet, events to host - you have a busy year ahead of yourself. Will the sun shine brightest on your city before the winter moon rises?

Everdell is a game of dynamic tableau building and worker placement.

On their turn a player can take one of three actions:
a) Place a Worker: Each player has a collection of Worker pieces. These are placed on the board locations, events, and on Destination cards. Workers perform various actions to further the development of a player's tableau: gathering resources, drawing cards, and taking other special actions.
b) Play a Card: Each player is building and populating a city; a tableau of up to 15 Construction and Critter cards. There are five types of cards: Travelers, Production, Destination, Governance, and Prosperity. Cards generate resources (twigs, resin, pebbles, and berries), grant abilities, and ultimately score points. The interactions of the cards reveal numerous strategies and a near infinite variety of working cities.
c) Prepare for the next Season: Workers are returned to the players supply and new workers are added. The game is played from Winter through to the onset of the following winter, at which point the player with the city with the most points wins.


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User Ratings & Reviews

  • Fun game, with Beautiful art. very lengthy, in terms of learning, and just playing. I would definitely play again.
  • Solid game, like the buildings giving free critters like 7 wonders build chains. Tough choices when trying to figure out what you want to have in your town and what you won't have room for. Nothing super special/unique about the mechanics/feel for me, but it does everything well.
  • Played with Family Friends. Love, Love, Love. Price Point = YIKES
  • It seems like you put out a lot of cards without using many of the card abilities. Not as rewarding or as tight of a feel as other engine builders like Race for the Galaxy. Resource management is ok but Scythe and Catan do it better from what I experienced. Beautiful and charming and I would play it again right now, but I’d suggest a lot of games over it.
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Wow, nice varied list! Here'smine:

  • #Everdell - I think this is my favorite game to play with my wife. We've played a bunch of times, so no one has to learn the rules or anything, it's charming and non-confrontational, and just overall a comfort game for us.
  • #Kingdomino - so easy to teach, and anyone can play. Usually end up playing twice.
  • #Santorini - again, ridiculously easy to teach. Top 5 game for me. My wife isn't as big a fan, so it hasn't gotten as many plays since quarantine. :(
  • #Wingspan - I like this game, but it seems like all my friends love it. For that reason, it's super easy to get to the table. When I play with just my wife, it plays very quickly, which is cool.

Bought #Patchwork for my mother for her birthday, taught it to her and promptly lost. She likes certain games and really doesn't like others so it's always nerve wracking bringing something to the table. Apart from only playing at 2 I still think it is one of the very best gateway games in existence.

Got in a four player game of #Mariposas. I was very concerned this game would be too light but we ordered it to support Elizabeth Hargrave. I was pleasantly surprised, action selection isn't a mechanism I particularly love, I feel like the only person on earth who thinks #Concordia is just an ok game, but this game surprised me. It is far from a heavy game but it does have a really cool decision space between trying to achieve goals, trying to collect sets for special abilities and trying to set yourself up to be able to make it back to the bottom of the board at the end of the game. It doesn't share much with #Wingspan but I do think it exists in a similar space of a game and theme that is appealing to non gamers and accessible but with interesting enough decisions for a heavier gamer. I was really pleasantly surprised by this one.

Played a two player game of #Everdell which is my wife's favorite, I like tableau builders but the mechanic in this game of going from feeling like you just don't have enough workers/actions to do anything to having a full city and resources and event cards etc is as good as any game, the snowball in this one when cards start comboing each other is great. Still looking for a house rule that better deals with the deck bloat and number of repeat cards but supposedly that will be addressed in the next expansion. It isn't my favorite game but one I always enjoy.

Played another two player game of #Pendulum on the advanced sides of the board. I really appreciate how unique this game is and what a puzzle it can be but, in my opinion, a change of pace from the typical decision making process I go through in a game. I really like this one as something different, still feeling out overall opinion on it. My big suprise has been that instead of the assymetric players giving some type of powerful advantage I find they all do a great job of disadvantaging different engine building methods and make you really puzzle around them. I really enjoyed that but do wonder if with more plays there will become a more prescribed way to play with each one and force a lot more intentional blocking amongst players as part of game strategy. 

Got in a first play of #Alma Mater which my wife was adament we get, she's a writer and wanted the book pieces even if the game didn't live up to its promise. I was concerned this would be a game that just wasn't particularly good at 2. While I still think it will shine at 3 the "dummy" player and deck were about as easy as it could get and made it an enjoyable game. The game worked much harder to be thematic than I expected and I really enjoyed every aspect of it but the research track, though i think that was my fault for not realizing that was something I'd want to mitigate with student pieces (they provide different engine building bonuses in the income phase of the game). The game has a variable market and real scarcity for both money and certain books and having a track that you need to move up to increase the value of your type of book but also being a MAJOR part of end game scoring that uses escalating amounts of already tight resources that allow you to perform the other actions in the game felt like an obstacle for the sake of an obstacle. I do think if you know this going in you can make decisions in the early game that make it less of an issue. 

We were able to see family and so played multiple games of #Cartographers: A Roll Player Tale and #Bang!: The Dice Game at 8 players. I am constantly looking for a game that is both accessible and has a great decision space at 8 players. Suggestions are always welcome!

Finally got in my first two plays of #Paladins of the West Kingdom. I haven't played #Architects of the West Kingdom but have played #Raiders of the North Sea and had heard so many good things about Paladins and was able to get a ding and dent copy and snatched it up. To me the decision space and game dynamics felt like a weird combination between #Orléans (colored worker spaces, workshops acting like tech tiles) and the track synergies of #Tapestry but a game I enjoy, so far, better than both. I had very little doubt this would be a game I would really enjoy but was surprised at how much. 

Haven't been able to play #Alma Mater yet, should get it in this week. I feel pretty confident the 2 player isn't going to be as good as more players since there is a variable market but I'm hoping that's a minor issue, seems like the "dummy" player is low maintenance. Like #Clans of Caledonia has a moving market and I don't think it hurts the two player game. 

My wife wasn't drawn to #Brass: Birmingham but loves it now that we've played it- her favorites are #Underwater Cities #Everdell #Agricola (Revised Edition) #The Castles of Burgundy #Wingspan #Tapestry. The card play and planning for the era change are things she really loves. I think it has a lot of things she likes in games that play more multiplayer solitare but with player interaction that isn't cruel. 

I 100% agree! A couple of my favorite games are #Oceans, #Evolution: Climate, and #Everdell. I love the tree too, haha. 

We also own and enjoy Wingspan and Isle of Cats! I haven't played Barenpark, but that and Isle of Cats are both animal themed polyomino games, so my initial inclination would be to say that you probably don't need both. I really like Isle of Cats though. The theme and art are really cute, and the gameplay is very engaging. So far I've only played at 2 players but I'd love to try it at a higher count as well.

This is an awesome idea! I'm not generally into co-ops myself, but I could see myself getting into that. You could also probably do something similar with #Everdell. It's a pretty peaceful game to begin with, so I think coming up with some common goal for players to work toward could work. Perhaps building the actual festival, or something like that.

I agree with most of the commentary below about Wingspan. It's a game I enjoy and really admire it but when I personally think of highly thematic games I don't think it's as good as others. I think the most spot on point is that while some of the mechanics are thematic (predator birds, birds that migrate habitats) plenty are not and it always feels like an engine builder for points rather than running a bird sanctuary. With that said, I think it does a great job setting a fantastic mood for the type of game it is, and the eggs, the wooden dice, the dicetower, the unique bird cards, the art on the player boards etc do a fantastic job of that. I do think it's important to remember what a great place Wingspan exists in in terms of being an inviting gateway game and I believe that how thematic it is is going to depend greatly on what your experience in gaming is up to that point.

 

I think Wingspan exists in an area of strategy games where the components themselves do a great job keeping it from being a dry game and giving it a mood and then the more the mechanics match the more thematic it feels. I think of #Viticulture: Essential Edition and #Agricola (Revised Edition) as games that do a great job of this with both mechanisims and components. I think #Root #Everdell #Tzolk'in: The Mayan Calendar and #Teotihuacan: City of Gods all do a great job setting the scene with their art and then matching it in varying degrees with mechanics. 

 

I can think of countless "Ameritrash" games that are highly thematic but skill checks often ruin that dynamic for me personally. Even a game like #Forgotten Waters which drips with story and theme after awhile didn't feel like much of a game to me and lost its immersiveness. While still not in my wheelhouse I found #Gloomhaven and #Gloomhaven: Jaws of the Lion to be much more immersive because the card play makes you feel like you are really dictating what happens and controlling your character. Conversely #Scythe was a game where the theme was almost non-existent to me until I played #Scythe: The Rise of Fenris and from then on the game was far more thematic in my mind than it had been previously. The most thematic game I've ever played would have to be #Pandemic Legacy: Season 1 and much like with Rise of Fenris, that experience has made other #Pandemic games feel more thematic just because I have seen how immersive it can be. 

 

A game that hasn't gotten any mentions yet that I've seen that's both a strategy game and highly thematic, in my opinion, is #Brass: Birmingham the historic accuracy that went into that game is remarkable and it really comes through in the most unique aspect to the game- the sudden switch from canals to rails. The included history of the characters in the rulebook is also a nice touch. I would contrast that with a game that I also love but don't find thematic which is #A Feast For Odin which, in true Uwe fashion, comes with what is essentially an entire book explaining the history that exists in the game but if you never read the book you would never really know and it's dry enough that you really don't need to and it becomes vikings playing tetris. 

The first time we played #Dune I put on the soundtrack from the David Lynch movie, so that was kind of fun. I've done a day where we played #Evolution: Climate and #Oceans back to back, which was cool. We could easily add in #Wingspan for a 3-game animal extravaganza, haha.

Or do a game of #Tiny Towns followed by #Everdell for an "anthropomorphized animals" theme, lol. I'm sure there are tons of games that can fit into that theme (#Root probably being the most notable). Start off with an easy game of Tiny Towns to get everyone warmed up, then have a nasty game of Root, then a nice game of Everdell where we can all just get along and hang out, haha.

Oh definitely. #Everdell is one of my favorite games!

A few of my "want to play but probably not going to buy" games:

I think I agree with your general sentiment when the cards are random and don't seem to have a real 'add' to the game.  I think the season cards in #Everdell: Spirecrest feel that way and the last time our family played we did not use them for that reason.  The Seasonal elements just don't feel necessary.

#Scythe is a good example of a narrative card that fits in well and doesn't make the game unduly laborious.  In fact, the Scythe objectives expansion is in my opion the best expansion for the game.  I think several of those 'encounters' significantly impact the game but in an interesting and fun way.

#Robinson Crusoe: Adventures on the Cursed Island has very negative encounters or events but you can mitigate them somewhat and they abolutely fit the theme of the day.  I pretty much expect to die every time I play that game but still have fun starving to death or getting eaten by wild animals.

A fun twist to the event card is a game like #PARKS in which the season card ends up being a boon for the season rather than a negative event.  I think this was a great twist to PARKS and goes well with the zenlike experience of walking through a PARK and gathering raindrops and roses to visit parks.

Looking through my games and my wishlist I do notice I don't have a ton of games that utilize the 'event' card type generally.  I think as a pure game antagonist I'm so-so on it ( #Pay Dirt) if not more or less against it ( #Everdell).  As a well crafted game enhancing theme driven option ( #Scythe, #Robinson Crusoe: Adventures on the Cursed Island); I'm all for it.

We got in a great game of #Everdell at our house this weekend.  

The Death Star from#Star Wars: Rebellion. The wooden meeples in#Root. The resource tokens in#Everdell. The miniatures in#Star Wars Imperial Assault. Lots of amazing components out there.

Personally I like #Paladins of the West Kingdom overall for both the solo mode (easy to run and challenging) as well as the 2-4 player games.  I've only played #Paladins of the West Kingdom with 3 players and mostly play with 2 and can't speak to the 4 player experience.  Most action take place on your own board and so the player interaction is minimal with the king's favors (beginning in round 3) being the most significant battele to some degree.  That being said the commion actions and garrison actions as well as attack and convert actions (4/6) will cause player to focus on what others are doing to one degree or another.

#Everdell has the largest footprint of all these games and if there is a reason it doesn't get played as much as the others to some degree it is because of this.  The solo mode is easy to run but I don't find #Everdell solo mode as compelling as #Paladins of the West Kingdom or #Architects of the West Kingdom.  To some degree it's the least interactive as each player is building their own tableau and sans the "meadow" that acts as a sort of group extention of your hand of cards and the buildings that other players build that you can visit, it's mostly managing your own tableau.  That being said, #Everdell is a great game, is in my top 10, and loads of fun and I have played this one with 4 players and found that to be the most fun despite the minimal player interaction. 

#Architects of the West Kingdom has the most player interaction in my opinion.  My family likes #Architects of the West Kingdom more than the others but #Paladins of the West Kingdom is my personal favorite of these three and is in my top 5 games.  I have the #Architects of the West Kingdom: Age of Artisans expansion and blinged pieces from Top Shelf Gamer for Architects as well but I thought the base game was fine as well and the wood pieces included seem pretty nice to me.  

I would say which of these game you will like the most will depend on h your personal preferences and what games you currently play and with how many players.  I you end up playing a lot of games solo and like a good challenge I'd go with #Paladins of the West Kingdom.  If you have friends and family to play with and they like pretty games and a more aestetic experience then I'd go with #Everdell or #Architects of the West Kingdom.  If player interaction is your highest priority then I'd go with #Architects of the West Kingdom.  If you favor worker placement then #Architects of the West Kingdom or #Paladins of the West Kingdom are you top choices.  If you like tableau building than #Everdell will be best.  

My two cents :)

Personally I like #Paladins of the West Kingdom overall for both the solo mode (easy to run and challenging) as well as the 2-4 player games.  I've only played #Paladins of the West Kingdom with 3 players and mostly play with 2 and can't speak to the 4 player experience.  Most action take place on your own board and so the player interaction is minimal with the king's favors (beginning in round 3) being the most significant battele to some degree.  That being said the commion actions and garrison actions as well as attack and convert actions (4/6) will cause player to focus on what others are doing to one degree or another.

#Everdell has the largest footprint of all these games and if there is a reason it doesn't get played as much as the others to some degree it is because of this.  The solo mode is easy to run but I don't find #Everdell solo mode as compelling as #Paladins of the West Kingdom or #Architects of the West Kingdom.  To some degree it's the least interactive as each player is building their own tableau and sans the "meadow" that acts as a sort of group extention of your hand of cards and the buildings that other players build that you can visit, it's mostly managing your own tableau.  That being said, #Everdell is a great game, is in my top 10, and loads of fun and I have played this one with 4 players and found that to be the most fun despite the minimal player interaction. 

#Architects of the West Kingdom has the most player interaction in my opinion.  My family likes #Architects of the West Kingdom more than the others but #Paladins of the West Kingdom is my personal favorite of these three and is in my top 5 games.  I have the #Architects of the West Kingdom: Age of Artisans expansion and blinged pieces from Top Shelf Gamer for Architects as well but I thought the base game was fine as well and the wood pieces included seem pretty nice to me.  

I would say which of these game you will like the most will depend on h your personal preferences and what games you currently play and with how many players.  I you end up playing a lot of games solo and like a good challenge I'd go with #Paladins of the West Kingdom.  If you have friends and family to play with and they like pretty games and a more aestetic experience then I'd go with #Everdell or #Architects of the West Kingdom.  If player interaction is your highest priority then I'd go with #Architects of the West Kingdom.  If you favor worker placement then #Architects of the West Kingdom or #Paladins of the West Kingdom are you top choices.  If you like tableau building than #Everdell will be best.  

My two cents :)

Personally I like #Paladins of the West Kingdom overall for both the solo mode (easy to run and challenging) as well as the 2-4 player games.  I've only played #Paladins of the West Kingdom with 3 players and mostly play with 2 and can't speak to the 4 player experience.  Most action take place on your own board and so the player interaction is minimal with the king's favors (beginning in round 3) being the most significant battele to some degree.  That being said the commion actions and garrison actions as well as attack and convert actions (4/6) will cause player to focus on what others are doing to one degree or another.

#Everdell has the largest footprint of all these games and if there is a reason it doesn't get played as much as the others to some degree it is because of this.  The solo mode is easy to run but I don't find #Everdell solo mode as compelling as #Paladins of the West Kingdom or #Architects of the West Kingdom.  To some degree it's the least interactive as each player is building their own tableau and sans the "meadow" that acts as a sort of group extention of your hand of cards and the buildings that other players build that you can visit, it's mostly managing your own tableau.  That being said, #Everdell is a great game, is in my top 10, and loads of fun and I have played this one with 4 players and found that to be the most fun despite the minimal player interaction. 

#Architects of the West Kingdom has the most player interaction in my opinion.  My family likes #Architects of the West Kingdom more than the others but #Paladins of the West Kingdom is my personal favorite of these three and is in my top 5 games.  I have the #Architects of the West Kingdom: Age of Artisans expansion and blinged pieces from Top Shelf Gamer for Architects as well but I thought the base game was fine as well and the wood pieces included seem pretty nice to me.  

I would say which of these game you will like the most will depend on h your personal preferences and what games you currently play and with how many players.  I you end up playing a lot of games solo and like a good challenge I'd go with #Paladins of the West Kingdom.  If you have friends and family to play with and they like pretty games and a more aestetic experience then I'd go with #Everdell or #Architects of the West Kingdom.  If player interaction is your highest priority then I'd go with #Architects of the West Kingdom.  If you favor worker placement then #Architects of the West Kingdom or #Paladins of the West Kingdom are you top choices.  If you like tableau building than #Everdell will be best.  

My two cents :)

Personally I like #Paladins of the West Kingdom overall for both the solo mode (easy to run and challenging) as well as the 2-4 player games.  I've only played #Paladins of the West Kingdom with 3 players and mostly play with 2 and can't speak to the 4 player experience.  Most action take place on your own board and so the player interaction is minimal with the king's favors (beginning in round 3) being the most significant battele to some degree.  That being said the commion actions and garrison actions as well as attack and convert actions (4/6) will cause player to focus on what others are doing to one degree or another.

#Everdell has the largest footprint of all these games and if there is a reason it doesn't get played as much as the others to some degree it is because of this.  The solo mode is easy to run but I don't find #Everdell solo mode as compelling as #Paladins of the West Kingdom or #Architects of the West Kingdom.  To some degree it's the least interactive as each player is building their own tableau and sans the "meadow" that acts as a sort of group extention of your hand of cards and the buildings that other players build that you can visit, it's mostly managing your own tableau.  That being said, #Everdell is a great game, is in my top 10, and loads of fun and I have played this one with 4 players and found that to be the most fun despite the minimal player interaction. 

#Architects of the West Kingdom has the most player interaction in my opinion.  My family likes #Architects of the West Kingdom more than the others but #Paladins of the West Kingdom is my personal favorite of these three and is in my top 5 games.  I have the #Architects of the West Kingdom: Age of Artisans expansion and blinged pieces from Top Shelf Gamer for Architects as well but I thought the base game was fine as well and the wood pieces included seem pretty nice to me.  

I would say which of these game you will like the most will depend on h your personal preferences and what games you currently play and with how many players.  I you end up playing a lot of games solo and like a good challenge I'd go with #Paladins of the West Kingdom.  If you have friends and family to play with and they like pretty games and a more aestetic experience then I'd go with #Everdell or #Architects of the West Kingdom.  If player interaction is your highest priority then I'd go with #Architects of the West Kingdom.  If you favor worker placement then #Architects of the West Kingdom or #Paladins of the West Kingdom are you top choices.  If you like tableau building than #Everdell will be best.  

My two cents :)

Personally I like #Paladins of the West Kingdom overall for both the solo mode (easy to run and challenging) as well as the 2-4 player games.  I've only played #Paladins of the West Kingdom with 3 players and mostly play with 2 and can't speak to the 4 player experience.  Most action take place on your own board and so the player interaction is minimal with the king's favors (beginning in round 3) being the most significant battele to some degree.  That being said the commion actions and garrison actions as well as attack and convert actions (4/6) will cause player to focus on what others are doing to one degree or another.

#Everdell has the largest footprint of all these games and if there is a reason it doesn't get played as much as the others to some degree it is because of this.  The solo mode is easy to run but I don't find #Everdell solo mode as compelling as #Paladins of the West Kingdom or #Architects of the West Kingdom.  To some degree it's the least interactive as each player is building their own tableau and sans the "meadow" that acts as a sort of group extention of your hand of cards and the buildings that other players build that you can visit, it's mostly managing your own tableau.  That being said, #Everdell is a great game, is in my top 10, and loads of fun and I have played this one with 4 players and found that to be the most fun despite the minimal player interaction. 

#Architects of the West Kingdom has the most player interaction in my opinion.  My family likes #Architects of the West Kingdom more than the others but #Paladins of the West Kingdom is my personal favorite of these three and is in my top 5 games.  I have the #Architects of the West Kingdom: Age of Artisans expansion and blinged pieces from Top Shelf Gamer for Architects as well but I thought the base game was fine as well and the wood pieces included seem pretty nice to me.  

I would say which of these game you will like the most will depend on h your personal preferences and what games you currently play and with how many players.  I you end up playing a lot of games solo and like a good challenge I'd go with #Paladins of the West Kingdom.  If you have friends and family to play with and they like pretty games and a more aestetic experience then I'd go with #Everdell or #Architects of the West Kingdom.  If player interaction is your highest priority then I'd go with #Architects of the West Kingdom.  If you favor worker placement then #Architects of the West Kingdom or #Paladins of the West Kingdom are you top choices.  If you like tableau building than #Everdell will be best.  

My two cents :)

If I had to pick I would go#Everdell.

For me, #Everdell takes it easily. The art is great, and the beautiful board combined with the giant tree, not to mention the eye-catching resources, make this game really pop.

I can see them possibly replacing #Everdell and maybe #Terraforming Mars or #Wingspan.  Everdell is the most likely as I think it might be the least good (?) game from a game design standpoint.  That's a bit of a stretch to say to some degree but one of the areas that can push a game up a little higher for me.  I usually have to play a game 5-6 times before I really get a great feel for the holes in the game mechanics.  

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Expansions

Everdell: Bellfaire Expansion board game
Everdell: Extra! Extra! board game
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Everdell: Legends board game
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Everdell: Pearlbrook board game
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Everdell: Spirecrest board game
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