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Popular Traitor Board Games (Mechanic)

These are the board games with the Traitor mechanic.
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Why I love Hidden Traitor games [Dead of Winter: A Crossroads Game]Like| 7 comments | [+]
GameplayDune - post-game report [Dune]Like| 50 comments | [+]
My Top 5 (or kind of 8) that play 5 or more [Coup, Archipelago, 7 Wonders, Not Alone, Dead of Winter: A Crossroads Game]Like| 10 comments | [+]
Board games like Among Us? image
Board games like Among Us? Like| 4 comments | [+]
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Oh boy... you've seen my posts before, so strap in and get ready...

Added

#Arcadia Quest: Riders, #Arcadia Quest: Frost Dragon Expansion, #Arcadia Quest: Fire Dragon Expansion, Arcadia Quest Poison Dragon Expansion, #ArchRavels (KS delivery), #The Battle of Armageddon (KS delivery), #Detective: A Modern Crime Game (Ding & Dent sale), #Dominant Species: Marine (P500 preorder), #Euphoria: Build a Better Dystopia, #Euphoria: Ignorance Is Bliss, #Excavation Earth, #Excavation Earth: Second Wave, #Faiyum, #The Great Race (KS delivery), #Marvel Champions: The Card Game - Scarlet Witch Hero Pack#Mini Express 🚂 A century of railroad expansion in 60 mins⏱️ (KS Delivery), #Overboss: A Boss Monster Adventure (KS delivery), #Pulsar 2849, #Rise of Tribes: Beasts & Bronze (KS dleivery all-in), #Ruins of Mars (KS Delivery), #Scythe: Modular Board, #Twilight Struggle, #Venice (KS dleivery), #Versailles 1919, #War of the Ring: Second Edition

That should be everything but I may have forgotten to put an aquisition date on something in my database so it didn't show up when I filtered. 

Thinking about Removing

#Transylvania: Curses & Traitors - Backed it on Kickstarter. Have never played it and haven't heard good things about it so I may just pass it on to Goodwill. Some kid who has never played anything but Mouse Trap or Monopoly may have their mind blown by it. 

#Zombicide - with the 2nd edition on its way, no need to keep this. Again, likely going to Goodwill to blow some kids mind. 

#Ghostbusters: The Board Game - Fell flat. Off to Goodwill.

#Bowling for Zombies!!! - Wanted to support a local company (Twilight Creations is in Cincinnati) but... eeeehhh...

#Battue: Storm of the Horse Lords - I bought it for $5 so my expectations weren't high. Off it goes.

#Traveller Customizable Card Game: Collector's Edition - Sounded neat... but card games are always more miss than hit with me. 

#Imperial Settlers - Totally meh. Will likely look to trade this in a math trade.

#The Island of El Dorado - Meh. Probably off to Goodwill.

#Hordes High Command - It's a card game. Blah. 

On My Radar

#Origins: First Builders and #Tabannusi: Builders of Ur are about the only non-KS games on my radar. I made a post a while back about my anticipated Kickstarters. (My Top 10 Anticipated Kickstarter Campaigns)

One of my all time favourite games is #Archipelago, it embodies so many of my favourite aspects of games: negotiation, hidden information, semi-cooperative play it is a game that has the best, most-petty, hilarious discussions and at its best I've rarely enjoyed sitting at a table moving meeples around so much.

However, I do think that the game is very much one of those that gets significantly better the more you play it with the same group and one that makes it easyfor people to bounce off of hard. I'll explain: when the game is first set out and the rules taught it appears very much to be a Euro/4X game. You gather resources, get upgrades, hire (or brith) new meeples, explore new sections of archipelago and build an empire. If you play it like a straight Euro game it isn't great: everything is slow and resource gathering is inefficent/can feel impossible, you don't have enough actions and the traitor (although they are definitely the 'good' or at least 'best' player morally speaking) seemingly has the easiest time rallying the native peoples to overthrow their colonial oppressors and bring the game to a premature end. (On a side-, but important, note, the other glaring flaw of this game is that it very much puts the players in the role of the bad guys casually exploiting an island and its people, and while within my group of friends we are pretty aware of this and use it to spark discuss and comment on how awful we are I can absolutely see this being a deal-braker for some and I wouldn't blame them in the slightest.)

Rant over, the problem with the way the game presents itself is that it is in reality a negotiation and deal-making game much more that it is a Euro-game. The way we have found it plays best, is when everyone is cutting deals and trading with each other while trying to get an edge. The semi-cooperative aspect really comes to life when you are negotiating who is going to use their hard earned resources to deal with the current crisis and how much you are going to pay them for it. The engine building side takes off when players are trading freely, as this is a free action, and so instead of having to use all your actions to collect 1 stone, 2 cows and 2 wood, you instead use one action to collect 8 pineapples and then trade them to get everything you need from other players. When you are trying to work out who is the 'traitor' and then working together (while of course trying not to make any real sacrifices yourself) to economically stifle that player and taking over their 'territory' (no one really owns anything in the game which is amazing) to limit their influence that is is when the game takes off and is a non-stop joy. However, the game doesn't mudge you to do these things at all, it is very much a sandbox, and while I love that aspect in many ways I can see how other people might try it once, not like it and then never bother again. So while I could say that they are just 'playing it wrong' and blame other players instead of the game. I think it is a legitimate critiscm of the game that it hasn't made how it wants to played clear, either mechanically or otherwise, and as such has made itself less accessible than it could have been. 

However, I adore this game, and whenever I teach it I make a point of highlighting these aspects. It still usually takes people at least until the second game to really grasp what makes the game tick, but once they do I've had so many people fall in love with it.

I think #Betrayal at House on the Hill could make for a good horror romp, maybe not a long running show but a mini-series could be cool. I guess you could try something like how they did the legacy version with each season being a different generation to show off different hauntings (I never played the legacy version but the concept sounded interesting, although I heard in practice it didn't quite work). I think if you went non-scripted it would make for a great game show, each with a different twist and one player becoming the 'traitor' part way through, maybe with more of the hauntings having hidden traitors.

If they were scripted I reckon #Diplomacy could make for a good satirical political drama. With dispassionate politicians carving up the world and betraying each other.

Obviously #Magic: The Gathering has a pretty rich collection of source material and some wonderful concepts for a fantasy adventure series, with characters moving through all manner of bizarre and beautiful terrains and meeting strange of terrifying creatures. 

My most memorable game moments definitely come from the games that have high player interaction and the opportunity for "dynamic" plays. That doesn't necessarily mean I enjoy games that don't have those things less, but this style of game just tends to create strong impressions, even though the enjoyment level in other styles of games can still be quite high. That being said, here are 3 games that are in my top 8, lol.

  • #Dune - of course this one is on here. Lots of memorable things can happen in this game, so I'll just give a few examples.
    • Tense battles where you don't know the outcome. What leader will they play? Do they have a poison weapon to kill my leader? How much spice can I afford to spend on this battle? Then the reveal happens, and sometimes...
    • TRAITOR! Revealing a traitor card to absolutely devastate your opponent in battle is an amazing feeling. On the flip side, it's definitely a feel-bad moment for the victim, but the possibility is part of what makes battles so nerve-wracking
    • Generally executing on a strategy to take strongholds. Winning this game via strongholds is always exciting, because it always comes down to at least one battle on that turn.
  • #Western Legends - this game just kind of lets you tell a western story that you want to tell.
    • Becoming a legend at the poker table - definitely seen some wins this way!
    • Become an infamous outlaw - rob the bank, rustle cattle, whatever you want! This is a fun path, but risky!
  • #Inis - this one is about clever drafting and timing, but there can definitely be some memorable swings throughout the game!
    • Efficient usage of the Geis card (cancel another player's action) is crucial to foiling your opponent's plans
    • Collaborating to stop the current leader from winning, just so the rest of you have the chance to grab the victory the next round

I feel like I'm always surprised at how much RPGs raise, but I guess I shouldn't be. RPGs aren't as disparate as board games are, especially when a lot of them use the same or similar systems, so their fanbase isn't divided where it might be in board games. "I don't like hidden traitor games" etc.

Just based on a cursory glance it seems like #The King's Dilemma would be right in my wheel house.  Bias, traitor, voting, yes please.