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Gloomhaven board game
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Root board game
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Viticulture: Essential Edition board game
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Spirit Island board game
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Pandemic board game
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7 Wonders board game
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Pandemic Legacy: Season 1 board game
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Concordia board game
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Ticket To Ride board game
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Race for the Galaxy board game
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Many, not all action drafting games have this sort of thing. I think most notably of #Puerto Rico and #Race for the Galaxy. These are two games that I love.

Depends on if you consider#Spirit Island to have any engine building. That's really the only game that I haven't clicked with. Which still bothers me. 

Yeah, I can see that being the case in something like #Root , where you kind of need everyone to be on the same level in order for the game to be balanced, although I guess the other players can warn the less experienced player that someone is about to become unstoppable. I kind of like in #Cry Havoc how your ability to take actions isn't too linked to your board state more the cards in your hand. So even if you get wrekced in a few combats, you can relatively quickly build back up and have an impact on the game, whoever controls the most territory will obviously be getting points for that but there are no special powers or resouces linked to them. Likewise as generally you troops have to start back at HQ when you recruit, if you spread too much you leave yourself very open to counter attacks.

A simultaneous draft could help cut down on the play time, a-la #7 Wonders and #Sushi Go!

I'm really not at all interested in games where I'm expected to lie or bluff.

Thanks, that good to know. We really enjoyed #Pandemic Legacy: Season 1 and have been considering what to play next. Not sure I could get a group of four together too consistently thought

I'm not sure we talk about #Root enough on this site....

Your argument is valid, however, I think it applies equally to the more general boxes we put games in. I remain unconvinced that it is a discreet enough unit to be considered a mechanism.

I think we come semantics. What is a game mechanism? This is the real question right now. I do think that engine building does describe how a game may feel to play. It may describe the general course you may wish to take as a player. And, as such, I find the term quite helpful. However, I do believe that the action of engine building is built of other, smaller mechanisms. You can play a game of #Race for the Galaxy without really building an engine. However you cannont play a game of #Agricola without placing workers. I haven't played #Viticulture, but I was under the impression that you could play it, according to the rules, without building an engine???? Is this right?

So, I come around to my original point. I believe that engine builder is a useful and enlightening term describing a type of game. I believe this for the same reason I find terms like "point salad," "euro," or "ameritrash" supremely helpful. But, when you use it as a mechanism I feel like you are not defining mechanism as narrowly enough to be really helpful.

P.S. Props to . I had started typing this reply, when I was called in for supper. I returned after supper, and finished it before I had noticed that I was only echoing his better written sentiments.

I love this list and agree with the vast majority if not all of it.  I am not a huge fan of games based on luck and so #Candy Land Game, #Yahtzee, or even #Dice Throne do not peak my interest much or my interest (say as in Dice Throne) is tempered somewhat.  

Games with luck that allow you to push your luck #Diamant, #The Quacks of Quedlinburg, or such I am a little more ok with but they still aren't my favorite games.  Those a more of a controlled adjustment strategy #Orléans or #Dice Forge I enjoy a bit more.

Other games such as the luck involved in drawing cards in #Gloomhaven or #Robinson Crusoe: Adventures on the Cursed Island that mimic the randomness of battle or wildlife are great and in both those cases the random nature impacts everyone (seeing as they are co-op games).  Even the luck of a drawn encounter card in #Scythe is mitigated by the balance across all encounter cards.

There are several games where I have felt that luck was not necessary and house ruled something to remove it. #Everdell: Spirecrest allows you to draw three cards from a seasonal deck at the end of each season and place them randomly at the bottom of the board with the first being free, the second costing a little more, and the third costing the most.  This seems arbitrary to me and so the last play we drew five, pick one, and place the others on the bottom of the deck.  In #Maracaibo is makes more sense to reveal all the privilege buildings at the beginning because there are 8, you randomly draw 4, and there's already enough luck with card draw throughout the game that revealing one each decade seems unnecessary. 

Two other games I've found luck workarounds are #Wingspan and #The Isle of Cats.  In Wingspan we draft cards at the beginning of the game with each player starting with 7 cards, drafting until necessary and discarding down to 5 (at least) by drafts end.  This gives everyone a fair shot at a solid opening hand and not ending up with 5 birds that don't play well in the first couple turns.  In Isle of Cats I divide the cards into green cards (baskets), purple, brown, and yellow cards, and blue card (lessons) stacks and each round we start the draft with each player getting three green, and choosing two or three from each of the other stacks.  THEN we draft.  This eliminates a whole round with NO extra baskets (unless you draft them away...in that case your loss).  

Great topic/mechanic choice!

#Pandemic Legacy: Season 1 currently sits on my shelf as I got it at a discount and look forward to playing it but have to wait for the right timing because I'd like to play it with my family or Becky at least.

I've played most of #Scythe: The Rise of Fenris and it is a great legacy experience (though somewhat short) and the best experience when you have a great grasp of all the factions and the basic gameplay (I wouldn't recommend starting out with Fenris)

#Gloomhaven was my first legacy experience and broke me through the wall of thinking I'd just prefer a one-and-done game.  I went into playing it not being 100% sure how much I'd like it.  The consequences from one game to the next are nearly as complex and weighty as in Pandemic (from what I understand) but the layered choices from which quest path to choice, to which cards to add as you level up, to the diversity of characters to choice from and the variability between characters make every session unique.  Not to mention that each scenario seems to have it's own unique twists.

#Charterstone is another legacy game sitting on my shelf waiting to be played.  I just have to wait for the right timing. #Sword & Sorcery: Immortal Souls was another legacy game I nearly forgot about.  I enjoyed it but the story and development of characters are limited compared to Gloomhaven and so it got traded some time ago.

#Pandemic Legacy: Season 1 currently sits on my shelf as I got it at a discount and look forward to playing it but have to wait for the right timing because I'd like to play it with my family or Becky at least.

I've played most of #Scythe: The Rise of Fenris and it is a great legacy experience (though somewhat short) and the best experience when you have a great grasp of all the factions and the basic gameplay (I wouldn't recommend starting out with Fenris)

#Gloomhaven was my first legacy experience and broke me through the wall of thinking I'd just prefer a one-and-done game.  I went into playing it not being 100% sure how much I'd like it.  The consequences from one game to the next are nearly as complex and weighty as in Pandemic (from what I understand) but the layered choices from which quest path to choice, to which cards to add as you level up, to the diversity of characters to choice from and the variability between characters make every session unique.  Not to mention that each scenario seems to have it's own unique twists.

#Charterstone is another legacy game sitting on my shelf waiting to be played.  I just have to wait for the right timing. #Sword & Sorcery: Immortal Souls was another legacy game I nearly forgot about.  I enjoyed it but the story and development of characters are limited compared to Gloomhaven and so it got traded some time ago.

I think just because a mechanic can encompass two things doesn't mean it doesn't exist, if that makes sense?  Right now the best thing I can think of to describe it is with America.  All Coloradans are American but not all Americans are Coloradan.

Or it might just be semantics which in this case I prefer the term Engine Building anyway.  When I think of #Viticulture: Essential Edition I think building the engine of my Winery seems more thematically appropriate as opposed to building the Tablue of my winery if I were to transfer it to a real life winery.

Ohh I'm totally with you on this one. I prefer this type of progression more than tabealu builders because it makes it feel more relatable than when it's just cards. The only games in my collection with something like this is #Clans of Caledonia and #Root to some degree. It's fun to place down more of your tokens from your player board to the map and to get bonuses in Root. And as the Woodland Alliance, you can place warriors on your board that will act as your "officers" that grant additional actions on your turn.

I remember reading that the designer of Clans was inspired by #Hansa Teutonica for the shipping, merchant, and tech upgrades. I'm pretty sure I won't have the opportunity to play that game with others, so I was glad that Clans is a bit of a mixed bag of great mechanics from multiple games (and it still works!)

By the way, have you seen this game yet? #Endless Winter: Paleoamericans. It seems to have a player board with "unlockables" as well. The art is done by The Mico (Mihajlo) who worked with Garphill Games for the North Sea and West Kingdom series. Apparently the design has been handled by those who've been involved with games like Rurik, Coloma, and Sierra West.

I had a dice phase some months ago when I was on the lookout for the perfect game with dice workers! And I agree with you, I really enjoy the perfect mixture of strategical thinking and tactical decisions you make when trying to deal with the bad rolls.

The only ones I've played are #The Voyages of Marco Polo, #Atlantis Rising (second edition), and #Camel Up (second edition)

Marco Polo bears some resemblances to Coimbra I believe. In MP, you have a set number of dice workers that you can place on various spots. You can spend resources to hire more workers or get re-rolls. The big catch in MP is (1) when taking an action that requires more than one die, the "power" of your action is determined by the lowest numbered die and (2) when you want to place your workers on an already occupied spot, (1) you have to pay to take that action. The amount you pay is determined by the lowest numbere die. This makes it so that low numbered dice are just as important when you're really needing to take actions on populars spots without breaking your bank for it. Besides this, this game features highly unique variable player powers where one character doesn't even need to roll dice haha 

For #Atlantis Rising (second edition), it's a co-op game where players work together to gather different resources from different peninsula that jut out from the center of the island. The probability of gaining a resource increases the further you go out to the end of the peninsula but you also run the risk of not being able to take that action if the location you're standing on happens to flood away. You roll dice to determine if you obtained a resource. You can mitigate bad luck by spending "Mystic Energy"

 

#Camel Up (second edition) is a racing game and each die corresponds to a camel of the same color. To be honest, I think this is my favorite out of these three games. I absolutely love the random, silly, chaotic fun of it even though there's very little strategy involved.

I'd love to try out #Troyes. I feel like it would be one of my favorites within this category. I also have #Root that uses dice but it's not the biggest part of the game.

lol, yes that is a nice aspect of #Viticulture: Essential Edition

I picked up #Concordia. It has been on my list for awhile and it finally went under $40.

Thanks for the list.

After a light week the previous week, got a ton of gaming in this time around.

After a light week the previous week, got a ton of gaming in this time around.

Totally.  I mean they are both in my top 5.  But I also I do believe that the overall experience would be enhanced in both.  Some of the uprgrades for #Root look really cool but I feel like they'd be too much and take away from playing it for me.

Do you think #Pandemic Legacy: Season 1 will fall the further you get from your play of it?

I feel pretty similarly about #Ticket To Ride, while I can imagine it being a good gateway game for people I just can't imagine ever chosing to play it myself. That said, I don't know that there are any games I would refuse to play if the group was keen.