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Gloomhaven board game
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Root board game
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Arkham Horror: The Card Game board game
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Rank: 36
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Clank! A Deck-Building Adventure board game
Forbidden Island board game
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Rank: 42
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Robinson Crusoe: Adventures on the Cursed Island board game
Forbidden Desert board game
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Rank: 74
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Mage Knight board game
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Rank: 75
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Betrayal at House on the Hill board game
Champions of Midgard board game
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Yeah, I can see that being the case in something like #Root , where you kind of need everyone to be on the same level in order for the game to be balanced, although I guess the other players can warn the less experienced player that someone is about to become unstoppable. I kind of like in #Cry Havoc how your ability to take actions isn't too linked to your board state more the cards in your hand. So even if you get wrekced in a few combats, you can relatively quickly build back up and have an impact on the game, whoever controls the most territory will obviously be getting points for that but there are no special powers or resouces linked to them. Likewise as generally you troops have to start back at HQ when you recruit, if you spread too much you leave yourself very open to counter attacks.

If I were to look at the game "objectively," I'd give it somewhere between 8 to 9/10. It's a fun, solid game that I'd be down to play when someone wants to. And the only reason why I don't rate it any higher is that I prefer games with more feeling of progression because they're more memorable and play out so differently with each game (e.g. #Clank! A Deck-Building Adventure, or games I haven't played like #The Quest for El Dorado)

So, while I'm over myself in terms of the game that I had wished for, I know that Fort isn't the typical game I would have gone out of my way to buy if I'm looking for a game to play with my wife (who also shares similar preferences.) If playing with more than 2p was a regular thing for me, than yes, I'd definitely get Fort. It's a wonderfully interactive deck-builder and I love games that really constrain or expand your moves based on the possibilities of what other players might do.

Hope that answers your question!

I'm not sure we talk about #Root enough on this site....

I love this list and agree with the vast majority if not all of it.  I am not a huge fan of games based on luck and so #Candy Land Game, #Yahtzee, or even #Dice Throne do not peak my interest much or my interest (say as in Dice Throne) is tempered somewhat.  

Games with luck that allow you to push your luck #Diamant, #The Quacks of Quedlinburg, or such I am a little more ok with but they still aren't my favorite games.  Those a more of a controlled adjustment strategy #Orléans or #Dice Forge I enjoy a bit more.

Other games such as the luck involved in drawing cards in #Gloomhaven or #Robinson Crusoe: Adventures on the Cursed Island that mimic the randomness of battle or wildlife are great and in both those cases the random nature impacts everyone (seeing as they are co-op games).  Even the luck of a drawn encounter card in #Scythe is mitigated by the balance across all encounter cards.

There are several games where I have felt that luck was not necessary and house ruled something to remove it. #Everdell: Spirecrest allows you to draw three cards from a seasonal deck at the end of each season and place them randomly at the bottom of the board with the first being free, the second costing a little more, and the third costing the most.  This seems arbitrary to me and so the last play we drew five, pick one, and place the others on the bottom of the deck.  In #Maracaibo is makes more sense to reveal all the privilege buildings at the beginning because there are 8, you randomly draw 4, and there's already enough luck with card draw throughout the game that revealing one each decade seems unnecessary. 

Two other games I've found luck workarounds are #Wingspan and #The Isle of Cats.  In Wingspan we draft cards at the beginning of the game with each player starting with 7 cards, drafting until necessary and discarding down to 5 (at least) by drafts end.  This gives everyone a fair shot at a solid opening hand and not ending up with 5 birds that don't play well in the first couple turns.  In Isle of Cats I divide the cards into green cards (baskets), purple, brown, and yellow cards, and blue card (lessons) stacks and each round we start the draft with each player getting three green, and choosing two or three from each of the other stacks.  THEN we draft.  This eliminates a whole round with NO extra baskets (unless you draft them away...in that case your loss).  

Great topic/mechanic choice!

I love this list and agree with the vast majority if not all of it.  I am not a huge fan of games based on luck and so #Candy Land Game, #Yahtzee, or even #Dice Throne do not peak my interest much or my interest (say as in Dice Throne) is tempered somewhat.  

Games with luck that allow you to push your luck #Diamant, #The Quacks of Quedlinburg, or such I am a little more ok with but they still aren't my favorite games.  Those a more of a controlled adjustment strategy #Orléans or #Dice Forge I enjoy a bit more.

Other games such as the luck involved in drawing cards in #Gloomhaven or #Robinson Crusoe: Adventures on the Cursed Island that mimic the randomness of battle or wildlife are great and in both those cases the random nature impacts everyone (seeing as they are co-op games).  Even the luck of a drawn encounter card in #Scythe is mitigated by the balance across all encounter cards.

There are several games where I have felt that luck was not necessary and house ruled something to remove it. #Everdell: Spirecrest allows you to draw three cards from a seasonal deck at the end of each season and place them randomly at the bottom of the board with the first being free, the second costing a little more, and the third costing the most.  This seems arbitrary to me and so the last play we drew five, pick one, and place the others on the bottom of the deck.  In #Maracaibo is makes more sense to reveal all the privilege buildings at the beginning because there are 8, you randomly draw 4, and there's already enough luck with card draw throughout the game that revealing one each decade seems unnecessary. 

Two other games I've found luck workarounds are #Wingspan and #The Isle of Cats.  In Wingspan we draft cards at the beginning of the game with each player starting with 7 cards, drafting until necessary and discarding down to 5 (at least) by drafts end.  This gives everyone a fair shot at a solid opening hand and not ending up with 5 birds that don't play well in the first couple turns.  In Isle of Cats I divide the cards into green cards (baskets), purple, brown, and yellow cards, and blue card (lessons) stacks and each round we start the draft with each player getting three green, and choosing two or three from each of the other stacks.  THEN we draft.  This eliminates a whole round with NO extra baskets (unless you draft them away...in that case your loss).  

Great topic/mechanic choice!

#Pandemic Legacy: Season 1 currently sits on my shelf as I got it at a discount and look forward to playing it but have to wait for the right timing because I'd like to play it with my family or Becky at least.

I've played most of #Scythe: The Rise of Fenris and it is a great legacy experience (though somewhat short) and the best experience when you have a great grasp of all the factions and the basic gameplay (I wouldn't recommend starting out with Fenris)

#Gloomhaven was my first legacy experience and broke me through the wall of thinking I'd just prefer a one-and-done game.  I went into playing it not being 100% sure how much I'd like it.  The consequences from one game to the next are nearly as complex and weighty as in Pandemic (from what I understand) but the layered choices from which quest path to choice, to which cards to add as you level up, to the diversity of characters to choice from and the variability between characters make every session unique.  Not to mention that each scenario seems to have it's own unique twists.

#Charterstone is another legacy game sitting on my shelf waiting to be played.  I just have to wait for the right timing. #Sword & Sorcery: Immortal Souls was another legacy game I nearly forgot about.  I enjoyed it but the story and development of characters are limited compared to Gloomhaven and so it got traded some time ago.

Ohh I'm totally with you on this one. I prefer this type of progression more than tabealu builders because it makes it feel more relatable than when it's just cards. The only games in my collection with something like this is #Clans of Caledonia and #Root to some degree. It's fun to place down more of your tokens from your player board to the map and to get bonuses in Root. And as the Woodland Alliance, you can place warriors on your board that will act as your "officers" that grant additional actions on your turn.

I remember reading that the designer of Clans was inspired by #Hansa Teutonica for the shipping, merchant, and tech upgrades. I'm pretty sure I won't have the opportunity to play that game with others, so I was glad that Clans is a bit of a mixed bag of great mechanics from multiple games (and it still works!)

By the way, have you seen this game yet? #Endless Winter: Paleoamericans. It seems to have a player board with "unlockables" as well. The art is done by The Mico (Mihajlo) who worked with Garphill Games for the North Sea and West Kingdom series. Apparently the design has been handled by those who've been involved with games like Rurik, Coloma, and Sierra West.

I had a dice phase some months ago when I was on the lookout for the perfect game with dice workers! And I agree with you, I really enjoy the perfect mixture of strategical thinking and tactical decisions you make when trying to deal with the bad rolls.

The only ones I've played are #The Voyages of Marco Polo, #Atlantis Rising (second edition), and #Camel Up (second edition)

Marco Polo bears some resemblances to Coimbra I believe. In MP, you have a set number of dice workers that you can place on various spots. You can spend resources to hire more workers or get re-rolls. The big catch in MP is (1) when taking an action that requires more than one die, the "power" of your action is determined by the lowest numbered die and (2) when you want to place your workers on an already occupied spot, (1) you have to pay to take that action. The amount you pay is determined by the lowest numbere die. This makes it so that low numbered dice are just as important when you're really needing to take actions on populars spots without breaking your bank for it. Besides this, this game features highly unique variable player powers where one character doesn't even need to roll dice haha 

For #Atlantis Rising (second edition), it's a co-op game where players work together to gather different resources from different peninsula that jut out from the center of the island. The probability of gaining a resource increases the further you go out to the end of the peninsula but you also run the risk of not being able to take that action if the location you're standing on happens to flood away. You roll dice to determine if you obtained a resource. You can mitigate bad luck by spending "Mystic Energy"

 

#Camel Up (second edition) is a racing game and each die corresponds to a camel of the same color. To be honest, I think this is my favorite out of these three games. I absolutely love the random, silly, chaotic fun of it even though there's very little strategy involved.

I'd love to try out #Troyes. I feel like it would be one of my favorites within this category. I also have #Root that uses dice but it's not the biggest part of the game.

Totally.  I mean they are both in my top 5.  But I also I do believe that the overall experience would be enhanced in both.  Some of the uprgrades for #Root look really cool but I feel like they'd be too much and take away from playing it for me.

#Pax Pamir (Second Edition) - Just about every component in this game is premium. I especially love placing down these blocks

#Clans of Caledonia - Love the wooden bits in this game. It's so satisfying to have loads of them on the map and producing so much resource for you during the production phase

#Root - The screen printing on meeples adds so much to their personality

#Camel Up (second edition) - Chunky camels with a rubbery plastic kind of feel. My favorite family game so far and these camels add a lot to the silly lighthearted vibe to the game

#Viticulture: Essential Edition - The wooden bits in this game have a smooth finish and I really like the shape of the meeple workers. But the glass grape beads are the absolute best

#Atlantis Rising (second edition) - Honorable mention. The selection of material type and color is so well done and makes you think, "oh wow, how did they afford this at this price point?" It just seems like an overall high production value compared to other games in the same price range

I have to check out #Underwater Cities.  That wasn't even on my radar.  I like your list.  Would love to play #Star Wars: Rebellion and #Mage Knight someday but one is huge and the other would probably take up #Gloomhaven plays.  Nice to have such a tough issue though for sure :)

I have to check out #Underwater Cities.  That wasn't even on my radar.  I like your list.  Would love to play #Star Wars: Rebellion and #Mage Knight someday but one is huge and the other would probably take up #Gloomhaven plays.  Nice to have such a tough issue though for sure :)

I generally rules out upgrades save for the last one here:

Everdell has some great resources (I have the collector's edition which could make a difference) and nice meeples in general.  One of the reasons my family loves this game is for the parts and pieces.

 

#Tapestry has a nice array of components from the common income buildings to the special buildings obtained from cards and racing up the tracts.

#Robinson Crusoe: Adventures on the Cursed Island has several great components and while they could be better it came out in 2012 toward the front end of better parts in a boardgame being as big a deal.

 

#Architects of the West Kingdom is my cheat because the parts are upgraded but they are fantastic...

all of the Architect parts have some heft to them :)

The Death Star from#Star Wars: Rebellion. The wooden meeples in#Root. The resource tokens in#Everdell. The miniatures in#Star Wars Imperial Assault. Lots of amazing components out there.

Ouch! That would be a dang hard choice!  Here's what I think off the cuff:

#Paladins of the West Kingdom - great solo experience and my wife plays and I think I can get the kids to play one day.  Possibly my favorite game to play solo.

#Gloomhaven - with so many quests to play I feel like if I only had five games I'd be able to get my family to play this.  The solo experience is great and I will probably play through the entire campaign solo at some point.

#Wingspan - One of our top played games and a favorite for Becky and I.  I enjoy the solo experiece with this game as well.

#Heaven & Ale - fantastic games and one of my hidden gems.  Not a lot of folks in the states play this one or have it high on their list as far as I can tell.  Becky will play this with me too.

#Scythe - The last game is tough to choose but Scythe has to me it because I have every expansion and it is great to play.  I've only soloed a few times but it is fun and it is my absolute favorite game with 6-7 player counts.  It's also blinged out pretty good, so this would be a tough one to pass on.

Runner Up - #Clans of Caledonia - could potentially replace Heaven & Ale but a tough call.  I think it would see slightly fewer plays than the others but the solo experience is solid.  

When I think of table presence, I think of quality components and board, board state that can tell a story (this goes with each component on the board having a significant purpose), and an overall joy to look at. Hmmm this is reallllly tough.... but I think this would be my current list:

5. #Camel Up (second edition) - This is a really strange pick, but I love seeing the stacked camels, the camels that are behind, the camels on the crazy camel's back, all of the tokens trying to derails the camels, the stacks of betting tickets or predictions of winners/losers, etc

4. #Root - This would be #1 if I actually got in plays with more than 2p this year haha

3. #Clans of Caledonia - My wife and I still really really like this game. It just has the perfect vibe and gameplay that blends so well together. The map and the components are wonderful to play with

2. #Pax Pamir (Second Edition) - Recent addition that I'm liking a lot. The selection of components on this game are brilliant. The kind of story it tells resembles Root a bit

1. #Clank! Legacy: Acquisitions Incorporated - It's so fun to see the map on this one. It's a vertical rectangular map and it's an adventure down into the dungeon. I love that the board alone gives you a sense of exploration.

When I first saw #Gloomhaven I thought there was no way I would ever spend $100 on a game.  It took playing other games of a similar genre ( #Descent: Journeys in the Dark 2nd Edition, #Sword & Sorcery: Immortal Souls) I changed my tune.

#Scythe was another game that I never thought I'd like because it looked too "Risky" (bah dum dum) for me to feel like I would enjoy.  

In both cases these turned out to be my top two games. 

Lol, I'm really trying to come up with lists that haven't been done. This has been a fantastic weekly challenge. #Champions of Midgard is a good one, don't know why I didn't think of that one. 

Love how creative these lists are getting with each day lol

For "vertical rectangle" I'm thinking of games like #Champions of Midgard, #Brass: Birmingham, and #Clank! Legacy: Acquisitions Incorporated

It's fasincating and surprising to see that your #1 ended up being the classic. And I'm honestly not sure where I stand on this. Oh and as for another type of playing surface, one I'd thrown in falls under dexterity games category. Jenga, #Men At Work, #Catch the Moon, where you have some sort of mini structural system you have to play on together.

Edit: Nevermind! Didn't realize Brass is basically a square. It really falls under your #4